Social & Economic Importance

Social & Economic Importance
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The Grenada Nutmeg Industry and its organization, the Grenada Co-operative Nutmeg Association has been developed as one of the leading economic pillars of the Grenada. Its economic importance has given birth to a rich culture germinated in the nutmeg.This can be experienced everywhere on the island – you are reminded by many symbols which speak with pride: our national-flag, regional coin, postal stamps, clothing and many folk festivals underscore its economic and cultural importance.

Grenada has always been known as the producer of the world’s top quality Nutmegs and this has cultivated great national pride in the nutmeg industry. This pride is visibly demonstrated throughout the entire industry from growing and harvesting to production phases.

Nutmeg and its by-products are literally used in hundreds of products including Cocoa Cola, toothpaste, pumpkin pies and chocolates. Its essential oils are used in famous perfumes like Hugo Boss and Chanel Blue or added as a means of preservative to European sausage. Nutmeg has inspired great paintings and jewelry, and has been the inspiration for the fairy story and musical “The Nutmeg Princess”, seen and read by thousands all over the world.

The Grenada Nutmeg Industry and its organization, the Grenada Co-operative Nutmeg Association has been developed as one of the leading economic pillars of the Grenada. Its economic importance has given birth to a rich culture germinated in the nutmeg.This can be experienced everywhere on the island – you are reminded by many symbols which speak with pride: our national-flag, regional coin, postal stamps, clothing and many folk festivals underscore its economic and cultural importance.

Grenada has always been known as the producer of the world’s top quality Nutmegs and this has cultivated great national pride in the nutmeg industry. This pride is visibly demonstrated throughout the entire industry from growing and harvesting to production phases.

Nutmeg and its by-products are literally used in hundreds of products including Cocoa Cola, toothpaste, pumpkin pies and chocolates. Its essential oils are used in famous perfumes like Hugo Boss and Chanel Blue or added as a means of preservative to European sausage. Nutmeg has inspired great paintings and jewelry, and has been the inspiration for the fairy story and musical “The Nutmeg Princess”, seen and read by thousands all over the world.

Social & Economic Importance

In 2002, Grenada Nutmeg and Mace contributed 22.5% of Grenada’s total merchandise export. It brought in valuable foreign exchange and provided employment and income generation particularly in rural communities,The passage of Hurricane Ivan and Emily in 2005 and 2005 respectively, affected all facets of Grenadian life. 90% of Grenada Nutmeg trees were destroyed. Production was seriously affected and the industry struggled to attain just over 10% of its pre-hurricane production level.

As many as 30,000 persons, a significant percentage of Grenada’s population, are affected directly or indirectly by the Nutmeg Sector. This includes registered farmers and their families, individuals employed on the estates and nutmeg stations, food processors and manufacturers, spice vendors, tour operators and other persons and businesses involved in tourism and agriculture.

Nutmeg was introduced to Grenada in 1843 as a viable crop to replace the declining sugar cane industry. It soon became one of Grenada’s leading export crops, recognized for its high quality and renowned for its exceptional good flavour, unique characteristics and a guaranteed international market. Nutmeg is at the core of Grenada’s culture, history and way of life.

In 2002, Grenada Nutmeg and Mace contributed 22.5% of Grenada’s total merchandise export. It brought in valuable foreign exchange and provided employment and income generation particularly in rural communities,The passage of Hurricane Ivan and Emily in 2005 and 2005 respectively, affected all facets of Grenadian life. 90% of Grenada Nutmeg trees were destroyed. Production was seriously affected and the industry struggled to attain just over 10% of its pre-hurricane production level.

As many as 30,000 persons, a significant percentage of Grenada’s population, are affected directly or indirectly by the Nutmeg Sector. This includes registered farmers and their families, individuals employed on the estates and nutmeg stations, food processors and manufacturers, spice vendors, tour operators and other persons and businesses involved in tourism and agriculture.

Nutmeg was introduced to Grenada in 1843 as a viable crop to replace the declining sugar cane industry. It soon became one of Grenada’s leading export crops, recognized for its high quality and renowned for its exceptional good flavour, unique characteristics and a guaranteed international market. Nutmeg is at the core of Grenada’s culture, history and way of life.